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Small Mammals + Pet Services + English

  • Telemedicine is the act of practicing medicine from a distance and your appointment will be conducted by a licensed veterinarian. Before your appointment, gather information on your pet’s history and your current concern. Look at a calendar and write down a timeline of your pet’s problems. Be prepared to answer questions that you would normally be asked at an in-person appointment. Write notes to help you remember everything. Most telemedicine appointments involve the use of some type of video chat. Conduct your visit in a quiet area with good lighting and have your pet with you before the call starts. Not all concerns can be addressed through telemedicine. If your veterinarian is unable to arrive at a diagnosis via telemedicine, he or she can help you determine the next step for your pet to ensure that he or she receives optimal care.

  • Having your pet properly prepared for a blood test helps to ensure that the results are as accurate and reliable as possible. Preparation for these two types of tests is slightly different. Your veterinarian will give you specific instructions before your appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions exactly to ensure accurate test results.

  • Winter cold weather poses a number of risks for our pets. Antifreeze commonly used in winter is extremely toxic if ingested. Cold damp weather can be very harmful so dogs should ideally be kept inside most of the time during the winter. If this is not possible, dogs need a raised shelter large enough to be comfortable but small enough to retain heat. Extra calories are needed for outdoor dogs to keep warm. Paws can be affected by frostbite, as well as ice or damaging ice melt compounds. Feet should be checked and wiped after being outside. Rabbits should be maintained at constant temperatures as they are not able to handle the differences between indoor and outdoor temperatures in winter.

  • Pyrantel pamoate is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat intestinal parasites in many species. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset, such as vomiting or diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinarian.

  • Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a fatal calicivirus that affects only rabbits. It can be transmitted by direct contact with a diseased rabbit or from feces, urine, or hair from a diseased or dead rabbit. There is no known treatment, but an American-made vaccine is available in the US. Europe has had a vaccine available for years.

  • Rabbit syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by a spirochete organism called Treponema cuniculi. Infected rabbits will develop sores that are confined to the mucocutaneous junctions, such as the external genitals, anus, lips, nostrils, and eyelids. Treatment involves two to three weekly penicillin injections. Humans cannot contract this disease from rabbits.

  • Rabbits can make wonderful pets for those willing to understand their unique characteristics and needs. They are very intelligent and always adorable, but require special handling and more supervision than some other pet species. As it is with all pets, though, rabbits require a healthy diet, lots of activity, social interaction, and routine veterinary care to live happy and healthy lives.

  • Fly strike is basically a condition where flies are attracted to the fur or exposed skin on a rabbit, whereby they lay eggs that hatch into maggots that subsequently cause extensive skin and deep tissue damage. The attraction to flies comes from urine or fecal soiled hair or skin that has been damaged by fight wounds, fleas or skin mites. Treatment requires veterinary attention and potential hospitalization. Prevention is attained by keeping your rabbit INDOORS and clean.

  • Ranitidine is given by mouth or injection and is used off-label to treat ulcers and erosions in the stomach and upper small intestine, reflux, or gastrointestinal motility issues. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset. Do not use in pets with a history of allergies to this class of drugs. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinarian.

  • Reproductive disease in ferrets is rare today, as most pet ferrets are spayed or neutered at a young age. One disease that is still occasionally seen in pet ferrets occurs in females that are not spayed. This is called hyperestrogenemia and is a result of persistently high blood levels of estrogen in unspayed females that are not bred or fails to ovulate.